Research in Glasgow (Archive)

We support research across all the fields of clinical, biomedical, physical or engineering sciences related to medicine. The following are awards made to researchers working in Glasgow's universities and hospitals between 1992 and 2005. [Link to information about grants awarded since 2006]

Awards in 2005-06

£79,252 over two years to Dr Patricia Martin (Biological & Biomedical Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University) & Dr Malcolm Hodgins (Cancer Sciences & Molecular Pathology, Glasgow University) to investigate the therapeutic benefits of gap junction inhibitors in chronic wound-healing events.
Wounds which do not heal properly (chronic non-healing wounds) are a major health problem, particularly in an ageing population. This study will investigate whether altering the levels of a small protein involved in the intracellular communication essential to normal wound repair processes, could improve wound healing.
£77,636 to Dr Sally L. Pimlott (Department of Clinical Physics, University of Glasgow) & Dr Andrew Sutherland (Department of Chemistry, University of Glasgow) for a two-year project to develop a molecular imaging tracer for the noradrenaline transporter.
Noradrenaline is one of the substances in the brain that allow signals to pass from one nerve to another. At present, no suitable tracer molecule exists to enable the study of noradrenaline in brain disorders, or in some types of cancer treatment. This project aims to develop a new tracer, use of which will lead to better understanding of the processes involved.

Awards in 2004-05

£79,807 over two years to Drs Robert Nibbs (Immunology), Dilys Freeman (Maternal & Reproductive Medicine), Professors Gerard Graham (Immunology) & Ian Greer (Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Glasgow University) for an investigation of the role of the chemokine receptor D6 in placental dysfunction.
Certain problems during pregnancy, such as the life-threatening pre-eclampsia, are caused by inflammation which damages the placenta. This study aims to investigate the potential for finding a biochemical means of controlling pre-eclampsia and other forms of placental dysfunction.
£60,537 over one year to Dr Mozheh Zamiri & Professor Colin Munro (Dermatology, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow) and Dr Malcolm Hodgins (Dermatology, Glasgow University) for research aimed at moving towards a comprehensive resource for elucidating the pathogenesis of inherited keratodermas.
Keratodermas are a rare inherited disorder which affects the metabolism of skin and results in painful areas of thickened skin on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. This project will use a bank of patient tissues to identify cell markers which might be useful as targets for drug treatment.

Awards in 2003-04

£79,644 to Dr Fiona A. White (Division of Clinical Neurosciences, Glasgow University) for a two-year project for the assessment of GADD34 as a potential therapeutic target in cerebral ischaemia.
This work aims to improve understanding of the molecular and cellular processes involved in the damage to brain cells which can result in stroke.
£75,394 over 18 months to Dr Amanda MacCallum (Institute of Comparative Medicine, Veterinary Pathology, Glasgow University), for an investigation of the early cell-signalling events in Campylobacter jejuni-infected enterocytes.
Campylobacter jejuni is the commonest cause of bacterial food poisoning in the western world and this work aims to clarify exactly how the bacterium enters cells in the gut and multiplies, resulting in disease.
£77,630 over two years to Drs Pamela Johnston, Chris Woodall & Penelope Redding (School of Life Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University) for an investigation of control measures to limit norovirus infections in a hospital environment.
This work aims to investigate ways of inactivating the highly infectious norovirus which causes the gastrointestinal disease known as 'winter vomiting' and is prevalent in hospitals and care homes for the elderly.
The Mrs Jean V. Baxter Medical Research Fellowship 2004-06 was awarded to Dr Linda Scobie (Veterinary Pathology, Institute of Comparative Medicine, Glasgow University) to continue her work on the control of human trophic replication competent porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) in cells and organs for xenotransplantation.

Awards in 2001-02

£60,594 over two years to Dr Linda Scobie (Veterinary Pathology, Glasgow University) for an analysis of full-length integrated porcine endogenous retroviruses and their infectious potential in xenotransplantation.
Being able to engineer organs in pigs which are suitable for human transplantation has the potential to save many lives. This research aims to identify the numerous viruses found in pigs which would otherwise make such transplants too dangerous.
£64,813 over two years to Dr Stephen J. Yarwood (Division of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Glasgow University) to investigate the role of EPAC proteins in inflammatory responses.
The protein EPAC is activated by cAMP, which has anti-inflammatory properties. As inflammation is the basis of numerous disorders, manipulating EPAC could prove a possible mechanism for new anti-inflammatory treatments.
£ 64,995 over two years to Dr James M. Brewer (Division of Immunology) and Drs Clive Bate & Alun Williams (Veterinary Pathology, Glasgow University) for an analysis of the role of cholesterol-sensitive domains in the trafficking and neurotoxicity of prions.
Prion diseases,such as CJD and BSE, cause death and dysfunction of neurones through mechanisms which are not fully understood. This study will look at the role of cholesterol-rich areas on neurones to establish if high levels of cholesterol are needed by prions to exert their destructive effects.
£64,839 over two years to Drs Winifred Boner & Iain Morgan (Veterinary Pathology, Glasgow University) for the characterisation of human papillomavirus 16 E2 cellular interacting proteins as therapeutic agents for treatment of HPV-related disease.
The life-cycle of the human papillomaviruses (HPV) is dependant on the E2 protein. Given the severity of diseases they cause and the lack of therapies, this research seeks to disturb E2 function to disrupt the viral life-cycle with molecules which could be therapeutic.
£58,637 over one year to Dr Jonathan T.O. Cavanagh (Psychological Medicine, Glasgow University), Professor David Wyper & Dr Jim Patterson (Clinical Physics, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow) for a SPECT study of the ratio of dopamine transporter to serotonin transporter in treatment-resistant compared with treatment-responsive depression.
In up to 30% of cases, depression is resistant to conventional treatment. This research will study the ratios of uptake of the neurotransmitters dopamine and serotonin in the brains of treatment-responsive and resistant depression to understand how the brain responds.
The Mrs Robina Menzies Medical Research Scholarship 2002-03 was awarded to Dr Kirstyn Brogan (Obstetrics, Queen Mother's Hospital, Glasgow) to investigate the role of sonembryology and maternal serum biochemistry in assessing the first trimester fetus at risk from chromosomal abnormalities.

Awards in 2000-01

£69,720 over two years to Dr Paul H. Everest (Veterinary Pathology, Glasgow University) for the identification of Salmonella enteritidis genes required for colonisation and survival in poultry and shell eggs.
Salmonella enteritidis is a major cause of bacterial food poisoning. This research seeks to identify the genes which are needed for the Salmonella bacteria to colonise and then survive in poultry and shell eggs.
£69,217 over two years to Drs Robin J. Plevin (Physiology & Pharmacology) & Dino Rotondo (Immunology, Strathclyde University) to study the regulation of cell-selective cytotoxicity by verotoxigenic infective E. coli O157 and, in particular, H7 cellular signalling cascades as novel sites for drug intervention.
E. coli O157 causes severe intestinal problems and is a highly infectious bacterium for which antibiotic treatment is largely ineffective as the effects are mediated by verotoxins. However, as not all body cells are equally affected by the toxins, this research will study the effects in different cell types.
£69,967 over two years to Drs Craig W. Roberts & James Alexander (Immunology, Strathclyde University) to develop a rational molecular approach to designing a vaccine against congenital toxoplasmosis.
There is currently no vaccine for congenital toxoplasmosis, a protozoal infection which can cause serious disease. This research aims to identify proteins with a strong immunological response, with a view to designing a vaccine.
£70,000 over two years to Drs Sean Carlin & Robert J. Mairs and Professor Anne Barrett (Radiation Oncology, Glasgow University) for the development of radioiodide-based therapeutic strategies for the treatment of malignant disease.
Certain cells, including breast cancer and thyroid cells, are known to be able to take up iodine. Treatment of thyroid tumours has been improved by the use of radioiodide and this research intends to establish if this mechanism could also bring benefits in breast cancer treatment.
£69,921 over two years to Drs Winifred Boner & Iain Morgan (Veterinary Pathology, Glasgow University) for the development of an HPV16 E2-interacting protein as a therapeutic target for interfering with the viral life cycle.
The life-cycle of the human papillomaviruses (HPV) is dependant on the E2 protein. Given the severity of diseases they cause and the lack of therapies, this research seeks to disturb E2 function to disrupt the viral life-cycle with molecules which could be therapeutic.
The Cruden Medical Research Scholarship 2001-02 was awarded to Dr Gregor M. Walker (Neuroscience & Biomedical Systems, Glasgow University) for the determination of the role of superoxide dismutase in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn.

Awards in 1999-2000

£84,954 over two years to Dr Gurman Pall, Professor Keith Johnson & Dr Catherine Winchester (Molecular Genetics, Glasgow University) for the identification and characterisation of the genes regulated by the homeodomain protein SIX5 and their contribution to the pathogenesis in myotonic dystrophy.
£69,961 over two years to Dr Robert Aitken (Infection & Immunity) and Dr Brian L. Jones (Microbiology, Glasgow University) for the development of recombinant immunotheraptutics against Clostridium difficile.
£42,647 over two years to Dr Paul Neary (Medical Cardiology) & Professor Godfrey Smith (Biological & Life Sciences, Glasgow Unviersity) to investigate the characteristics of spontaneous SR Ca2+ release in failing human myocardium.
£68,457 over two years to Dr Stephany M. Biello (Psychology, Glasgow University) for a study of the neural basis of circadian timing.
£69,045 over two years to Dr Iain B. McInnes (Centre for Rheumatic Diseases, Glasgow Royal Infirmary) & Dr Jeremy H. Brock (Immunology & Bacteriology, Glasgow University) for a study of lactoferrin-mediate resistance to Staphylococcus aureus infection.
£69,847 over two years to Dr Marie Boyd (Radiation Oncology), Professor S. Moira Brown (Neurovirology), Dr Robert J. Mairs (Radiation Oncology), Dr Wilson Angerson (Surgery) & Professor Tom Wheldon (Radiation Oncology, Glasgow University) for an in vitro assessment of a new treatment for glioma combining virally-mediated cell lysis with gene transfer and targeted radiotherapy.
£69,321 over two years to Dr Janice Spencer, Dr Alun Williams & Professor Mark Roberts (Veterinary Pathology, Glasgow University) for a study of host-pathogen interactions during colonisation of preferred microenvironments by verocytotoxogenic Escherichia coli O157:H7 in young and adult cattle.
£69,162 over two years to Drs Thomas R.J. Evans, J. J. Going, Mr R. C. Stuart & Dr W.N. Keith (CRC Medical Oncology, Glasgow University) to study the senescence-like state of human oesophago-gastro cancers and its implication for response to cancer therapy.
£31,293 over three years to Dr Stuart R. Cobb (Neurosience & Biomedical Systems, Glasgow University) to investigate the role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in controlling epileptiform activity.
The Nasmyth Travelling Research Scholarship 2000-2002 was awarded to Dr Tracey A. Baird (Specialist Registrar, Neurology, Southern General Hospital, Glasgow) to visit the Department of Neurology, Royal Melbourne Hospital and the Centre for Brain Imaging Research, Austin & Repatriation Medical Centre, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia.
The focus of Dr Baird's research is to find new, simple and cost-effective ways to diagnose and treat acute stroke - a disease which remains the third commonest cuase of dealth in Scotland.

Awards in 1998-99

£68,952 over two years to Professor Timothy Mitchell & Dr John Coote (Infection & Immunity, Glasgow University) and Mr Stuart Clarke (Microbiology, Stobhill Hospital, Glasgow) for a study of the role of RTX proteins in the pathogenesis of disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis and their potential as vaccine molecules.
£63,819 over 18 months to Drs Naveed Sattar (Biochemistry, Glasgow Royal Infirmary), Jane Ramsay & Alan Mathers (Glasgow Royal Maternity Hospital), William Ferrell (Medicine, Glasgow Royal Infirmary) and Professor Ian A. Greer (Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Glasgow University) for direct assessemnt of microvascular function in pre-eclampsia using laser Doppler imaging.
£18,587 for a one-year project to Drs Andrew J. Thomson, Jane E. Norman and Professor Ian A. Greer (Obstetrics & Gynaecology) and Miss Marshia Crawford (Molecular & Cellular Biology, Glasgow University) to study the role of leucocytes in term and pre-term labour.
The Mrs Jean V. Baxter Medical Research Fellowship 1999-2002 was awarded to Dr Sophie V. Barrett (Beatson Oncology Centre, Western Infirmary Glasgow) to investigate mismatch DNA repair and drug resistance of breast tumours.
A one-year Medical Research Scholarship 1999-2000 was awarded to Dr Scott M. Nelson (Queen Mother's Hospital, Glasgow) to identify prognostic indicators of pulmonary hypoplasia in fetal congenital diaphragmatic hernia and obstructive uropathy.

Awards in 1997-98

£15,170 over two years to Dr Charles Deehan (Beatson Oncology Centre, Western Infirmary Glasgow), Dr Thomas E. Wheldon (CRC Beatson Laboratories, Glasgow University) and Professor Alex T. Elliott (Clinical Physics, Western Infirmary Glasgow) for radiobiological modelling of new strategies for clinical radiotherapy.
£61,416 over 18 months to Dr Mark E.S. Bailey & Professor Keith J. Johnson (Division of Molecular Genetics) and Dr Alison Kerr (Psychological Medicine), Drs Goran A. Jamal & Peter Oketa-Onyut Julu (Neurology, Glasgow University) for an investigation of GABAa receptor subunit genes on the X chromosome ascandidates in Rett Syndrome (Dr Bailey was also awarded the Cruden Scholarship as part of the funding for this project).
£60,092 over two years to Dr W. Nicol Keith (CRC Medical Oncology), Dr James J. Going (Pathology) and Mr Robert C. Stuart (Surgery, Glasgow University) to investigate the role of telomerase expression and replicative ageing in Barrett's oesophagus.
£98,855 over three years to Drs Allan Mowat & Paul Garside (Immunology, Glasgow University) to investigate cellular mechanisms of bystander tolerance induced by oral administration of antigen.

Awards in 1996-97

£9,935 to Dr Jane Norman and Professor Ian Greer (Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Dr Isobel Walker (Haematology, Glasgow Royal Infirmary) and Dr Alan Cameron (Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Queen Mother's Hospital, Glasgow) for a one-year study of the possible association of Factor V Leiden with recurrent miscarriage.
£68,806 to Professor Alison M. Gurney (Physiology & Pharmacology, Strathclyde University) for a two-year study aimed at developing a fluorescent assay for drugs that modulate pulmonary artery potassium channels.
£69,952 to Dr Jane Norman, Professor Ian Greer, Dr John A. Harper & Dr Charles B. Lunan (Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Glasgow Royal Infirmary) for a two-year study of the role of nitric oxide in human cervical ripening.
£69,954 to Professor Foo Y. Liew (Immunology, Glasgow University) for a two-year project involving the cloning of molecules on T cells inducible by IL-15 but not by IL-2 in rheumatoid arthritis using differential display and suprression subtractive hybridisation.
£50,818 to Drs Christopher Deighan & J.M. Boulton-Jones (Renal Unit) and Professor Christopher Packard and Dr M. Caslake (Pathological Biochemistry, Glasgow Royal Infirmary) for a one-year study of anbnormalities of lipoprotein metabolism in proteinuria and its role in cardiovascular risk and the progression of chronic renal failure.
£2,960 to Drs Russell L. Woods & Stephen J. Tregear (Vision Sciences, Glasgow Caledonian University) to purchase a camera attachment for use in screening for diabetic retinopathy using cone-specific perimetry.
£25,963 to Dr Deborah Dewar (Wellcome Surgical Unit, Glasgow University) for a one-year in vitro study using organotypic slice cultures of presynaptic protein damage after ischaemia.
£78,82 to Dr Helen Lyall (Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Glasgow Royal Infirmary), Professor Iain T. Cameron (Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Queen Mother's Hospital Glasgow), Dr John R. Petrie & Professor John M. Connell (Medicine & Therapeutics, Western Infirmary Glasgow) and Dr Gwynn W. Gould (Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Glasgow University) for a two-year study of insulin as a vascular hormone in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

Awards in 1995-96

£56,145 to Professor Janet M. Allen (Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, Glasgow University) for a study of neuronal differentiation induced by the neuropeptide pituitary adenylyl cyclase activating peptide (PACAP).
£31,967 to Dr Margaret M. Harnett (Immunology, Glasgow University) and Professor Roger D. Sturrock (Centre for Rheumatic Diseases, Glasgow Royal Infirmary) to investigate whether lesions in phospholipase A2 signalling in FAS and TNF-mediated T-cell apoptosis break periperal tolerance, inducing autoimmune disease such as rheumatoid arthritis.

Awards in 1994-95

£100,000 as a capital grant to Professors Henry Dargie (Medicine & Therapeutics), Ian McGrath (Physiology) and Stuart Cobbe (Medical Cardiology, Glasgow Royal Infirmary) all of Glasgow University, to fund the provision of a suite of five research laboratories as part of the University's Clinical Research Initiative into cardiovascular disease.
£7,647 to Dr Jeremy Bagg & Miss Kirsty Roy (Glasgow Dental School), Dr Edward A. Follett (HIV/Hepatitis Laboratory) and Dr David J. Goldberg (Scottish Centre for Infection & Environmental Health, Ruchill Hospital, Glasgow) for a one-year study aimed at optimising specimen collection methods for the detection of hepatitis C in saliva.
£57,799 to Professor Janet M. Alllen (Molecular Medicine, Glasgow University) over 23 months for studies on the mechanism of Fc(gamma)RI internalisation of antigen.
£36,063 to Dr Karen Horsburgh (Wellcome Surgical Institute & Hugh Fraser Laboratories, Glasgow University) for a one-year study of alterations in protein kinase C and amyloid precursor protein in human head injury and stroke.
£56,805 over two years to Professor Alex Elliott & Mr Keith McKellar (Clinical Physics, Glasgow University), Professor James McKillop (Medicine), Dr Brian Neilly (Nuclear Medicine) and Dr Curtis Gemmell (Biochemistry, Glasgow Royal Infirmary) for a study involving novel radiopharmaceutical approaches to inflammation imaging.
The Mrs Jean V. Baxter Medical Research Fellowship 1995-97 was awarded to Dr Martin McIntyre (Medicine & Therapeutics, Western Infirmary Glasgow) for a study of endothelial nitric oxide deficiency in cardiovascular disease and its consideration as a target for genetic manipulation.

Awards in 1993-94

£62,170 over two years to Professor Iain T. Cameron & Dr Fiona Lyall (Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Glasgow University) & Dr Anthony P. Davenport (Cambridge University) for an investigation of endothelin receptor subtypes in human endometrium and their role in the pathophysiology of menorrhagia.
£89,850 over two and a half years to Drs Hugh J. Willison & G. Paterson (Neurology, Glasgow University) and colleagues in Cambridge, London and Texas, for a study involving combinatorial library cloning of anti-ganglioside antibodies from autoimmune neuropathy patients.
£62,850 over two years to Dr Carol E. Chu (Duncan Guthrie Institute of Medical Genetics, Yorkhill Hospital, Glasgow) & Professor J.M. Connor (Medical Genetics, Glasgow University) for a clinical and molecular genetic analysis of Turner's Syndrome, correlating genotype to phenotype.
The Cruden Medical Research Scholarship was awarded to Dr Kevin W. Robertson (Surgery, Glasgow Royal Infirmary University NHS Trust) to study the role of EGF and C-ERBB-2 receptors in determining the invasive potential of breast cancer.

Awards in 1992-93

£73,000 over two years to Dr David I. Stott (Bacteriology & Immunology, Glasgow University) for a study of the genetic origins and control of expression of autoaggressive B-cell clones in systemic lupus erythematosus.
£60,464 to Professor Colin S. McArdle, Mr Barry Kelly & Dr Wilson J. Angerson (Surgery, Glasgow Royal Infirmary) for a two-year investigation of the detection of 'occult' liver metastases using duplex/colour Doppler ultrasonography.
Professor William R. Lee (Ophthalmology & Pathology) & Dr John G. Edwards (Cell Biology, Glasgow University) to investigate the familial and autoimmune aspects of age-related macular degeneration.
£84,827 over three years to Dr Donald Bissett (Beatson Oncology Centre, Western Infirmary Glasgow) & Dr Robert Brown (Medical Oncology, Glasgow University) to study the role of p53 in resistance of tumours to the chemotherapeutic drug, cisplatin.
£55,280 to Dr John M.S. Bartlett, Dr D. Fenton-Lee & Professor Tim G. Cooke (Surgery, Glasgow Royal Infirmary), Dr Valerie Brunton (CRC Department for Medical Oncology) & Dr Brad Ozanne (Beatson Institute for Cancer Research, Glasgow) for a two-year study of the use of novel inhibitors of EGF receptor tyrosine kinase activity as potential therapeutic agents in the control of gastric cancer.
£105,793 over three years to Dr Anna F. Dominiczak & Professor John L. Reid (Medicine & Therapeutics, Glasgow University), Dr Marek H. Dominiczak (Biochemistry, Western Infirmary Glasgow) & Dr Christopher J.K. Packard, Professor James Shepherd & Dr Dairena Gaffney (Biochemistry, Royal Infirmary Glasgow) to investigate the biochemical, cellular and genetic characteristics of familial hypercholesterolaemia in the west of Scotland.
£54,014 over two years to Dr Donald M. Salter (Pathology, Edinburgh University) to investigate the potential of tenascin as a serological marker of arthritis and to assess its role in articular cartilage degeneration and repair.
The Mrs Jean V. Baxter Medical Research Fellowship 1993-95 was awarded to Dr Karen J. Horsburgh (Wellcome Surgical Institute & Hugh Fraser Laboratories, Glasgow University) for work on protein kinase and beta-amyloid protein deposition in human head injury and stroke.

[Read about grants awarded since 2006]